The Lenin Lane Housing
2012–2020
Fifth Year Architecture
“All inhabited space bears the essence of the notion of home” - Gaston Bernard. The home is a treasury that helps to define people’s identities and captures their cultural heritage. For many people, their experiences of home are not as easily defined as their ideas of what constitutes a home, and these differ reflecting personal experiences. This is especially so for people that live in contested cities.

The city of Gdansk has survived many conflicts. Its most contested areas are by-products of industrial decline, saturation tourism and environmental threats. This project seeks to evaluate how these conflicts impact and affect the use, form and fundamentally the identity of home. By analysing different contested cities with their own challenges, in relation to Gdansk, a greater understanding of the true meaning of the term home has been formed. That meaning differs across cultural landscapes. This has highlighted key design principles that support ideas of identity and informs how architecture can represent these principles in culturally meaningful ways.

These principles have become the core strategy for a future housing collective in Gdansk. In order to prioritise the needs of the citizens of the city and to bring relief to the contested area, the housing aims to be affordable, adaptable, and accessible to all. Through close reference to Gdank’s heterogeneous urban landscape and architectural styles the new housing will reflect the city’s diverse identity. In doing so it will help inhabitants to connect to the genius loci of the place through their everyday rituals. This concept will transfer into the private dwelling thus creating a strong identity of home, that reaches beyond its walls.
“All inhabited space bears the essence of the notion of home” - Gaston Bernard. The home is a treasury that helps to define people’s identities and captures their cultural heritage. For many people, their experiences of home are not as easily defined as their ideas of what constitutes a home, and these differ reflecting personal experiences. This is especially so for people that live in contested cities.

The city of Gdansk has survived many conflicts. Its most contested areas are by-products of industrial decline, saturation tourism and environmental threats. This project seeks to evaluate how these conflicts impact and affect the use, form and fundamentally the identity of home. By analysing different contested cities with their own challenges, in relation to Gdansk, a greater understanding of the true meaning of the term home has been formed.


That meaning differs across cultural landscapes. This has highlighted key design principles that support ideas of identity and informs how architecture can represent these principles in culturally meaningful ways.

These principles have become the core strategy for a future housing collective in Gdansk. In order to prioritise the needs of the citizens of the city and to bring relief to the contested area, the housing aims to be affordable, adaptable, and accessible to all. Through close reference to Gdank’s heterogeneous urban landscape and architectural styles the new housing will reflect the city’s diverse identity. In doing so it will help inhabitants to connect to the genius loci of the place through their everyday rituals. This concept will transfer into the private dwelling thus creating a strong identity of home, that reaches beyond its walls.


The Lenin Lane
Housing principles axo
Ground floor plan
Variety of housing types
First floor plan
Section through tower and plaza
Canal edge thresholds
Lenin lane section